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Preventing ACL Injuries in Athletes by Jerry Shreck

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Filed Under (Fitness, Interviews) by Rick Kaselj on 18-09-2012

Today I have an interview for you on Preventing ACL Injuries in Athletes.

It is with long time Athletic Therapist, Jerry Shreck. who is at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.

Over they years he has put together an ACL injury prevention program with his athletes at the university that has drastically decreased ACL injuries in their athletes.

He shares what he does in the interview.

Enjoy the interview.

CLICK HERE to listen to the interview with Jerry Shreck on Preventing ACL Injuries in Athletes.

 

CLICK HERE to listen to the interview with Jerry Shreck on Preventing ACL Injuries in Athletes.

What Jerry Shreck shares in the interview:

  • What’s the big deal on having ACL injuries on athletes?
  • Differentiates between contact and non-contact ACL injuries
  • Explains why women are more susceptible to getting ACL injuries
  • What is the traditional thinking about fixing the ACL?
  • What are those preventive measures that he focuses on with his athletes when it comes to ACL injuries?
  • What are the common mistakes that trainers do when designing a program for ACL injuries?
  • Explains what his Deceleration Training Program is and how people can benefit from it
  • Gave tips on things to do to prevent ACL injuries in your athletes
  • Who is Jerry Shreck?

A few things you need to know about listening to the interview:

  • To listen to the interview, scroll down to the bottom of this page and click the play button symbol. If you do not have time to listen to it right now, just click the “download” button and download it to your computer. Then you can listen to it on your computer when you like.
  • Also the interview is up on iTunes. You can listen to it HERE or subscribe to the itunes podcast and get all the interviews when they are ready. Enjoy!
  • If you use Chrome as your web browser, at times it can act up when playing the interview. I would suggest listening to the interview in another web browser (Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer, etc.)
  • Here is a video explaining how to download the interview recording

If you would like to get more information on Jerry, you can check out his Deceleration Training Program to Prevent ACL Tears, here:

 

If you have a neat specialization or business information that would be of benefit for fitness professionals to know about, please do contact me and I would love to share it with the EFI world.

If you know of a fitness professional or someone that works with athletes a may benefit from this interview, please forward it onto them.

Take care.

Rick Kaselj, MS

P.S. – If you liked this interview with Jerry, you will like these other ones as well:

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What Can Athletes Do About Knee Pain with Anthony Mychal

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Filed Under (Fitness, Interviews, Knee Injury, Knee Pain) by Rick Kaselj on 18-07-2012

I am back with you with information on knee pain and athletes.

Anthony has been on EFI before; he wrote a very popular article on Chronic Knee Pain.

Before I get into the interview, let’s talk about the next edition of Muscle Imbalances Revealed – Assessment and Exercise . Anthony is the third contributor and he will be presenting on Assessment and Exercise for Athleticism.

Okay, let’s get to the interview!

CLICK HERE to listen to the interview with Anthony Mychal on What Can Athletes Do About Knee Pain.

CLICK HERE to listen to the interview with Anthony Mychal on What Can Athletes Do About Knee Pain.

What Anthony Mychal Shares in the Interview:

  • Who is Anthony Mychal?
  • What is his acrobatic background and how he defines it.
  • What is tricking?
  • Shares his own knee pain story and how he overcame it.
  • What is his idea on the difference between Athlete Knee Pain and Non-Athlete Knee Pain?
  • How does body position in athletes change when it relates to knee pain?
  • What are the important things to consider in overcoming knee pain?
  • Does “strengthening” your knee really work when it comes to ending knee pain?
  • Gives his number one tip on maintaining good knee health.
  • Talks about mobility drills and the benefits it gives to get rid of knee pain.
In the interview, we talk about his knee pain book. You can get more details on it here.

A few things you need to know about listening to the interview:

  • To listen to the interview, scroll down to the bottom of this page and click the play button symbol. If you do not have time to listen to it right now, just click the “download” button and download it to your computer. Then you can listen to it on your computer when you like.
  • Also the interview is up on iTunes. You can listen to it HERE or subscribe to the itunes podcast and get all the interviews when they are ready. Enjoy!
  • If you use Chrome as your web browser, at times it can act up when playing the interview. I would suggest listening to the interview in another web browser (Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer, etc.)
  • Here is a video explaining how to download the interview recording

If you have a neat specialization or business information that would be of benefit for fitness professionals to know about, please do contact me and I would love to share it with the EFI world.

If you know of a fitness professional or someone with knee pain that may benefit from this interview, please forward it onto them.

Take care.

Rick Kaselj, MS

P.S. – If you liked this interview, here are some other interviews that may help you:

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Nick Rosencutter on Corrective Exercise and Performance

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Filed Under (Corrective Exercise, Fitness, Interviews) by Rick Kaselj on 11-07-2012

Back with you today with an interview.  Today it is on corrective exercise and performance.

It is with Nick Rosencutter, who has been on EFI before.  His stuff on corrective exercise and performance was very popular so I asked him for an interview so we can go into things in more depth.

One other exciting thing is Nick is one of the other contributors to the next edition of Muscle Imbalances Revealed, which will be out July 31.

Lets get to the interview.

Enjoy the interview!

CLICK HERE to listen to the interview with Nick Rosencutter on Corrective Exercise and Performance.

 

CLICK HERE to listen to the interview with Nick Rosencutter on Corrective Exercise and Performance.

What Nick Rosencutter Shares in the Interview:

  • Who is Nick Rosencutter?
  • What is his definition of corrective exercise?
  • How to incorporate corrective exercise within an exercise program?
  • What is classified as corrective exercise?
  • Shares his dream of having his own fitness facility and tips on how to actually own one.
  • What is the most important thing he had learned in owning a gym?
  • Few corrective exercises nuggets he forgot to mention
  • What are the things that fitness professionals should consider when it comes to starting their own facility?

A few things you need to know about listening to the interview:

  • To listen to the interview, scroll down to the bottom of this page and click the play button symbol. If you do not have time to listen to it right now, just click the “download” button and download it to your computer. Then you can listen to it on your computer when you like.
  • Also the interview is up on iTunes. You can listen to it HERE or subscribe to the itunes podcast and get all the interviews when they are ready. Enjoy!
  • If you use Chrome as your web browser, at times it can act up when playing the interview. I would suggest listening to the interview in another web browser (Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer, etc.)
  • Here is a video explaining how to download the interview recording

If you have a neat specialization or business information that would be of benefit for fitness professionals to know about, please do contact me and I would love to share it with the EFI world.

If you know of a fitness professional that may benefit from this, please forward it onto them.

Take care.

Rick Kaselj, MS

P.S. – If you liked this kind of interview, here are some other interviews that may help you:

 

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John Izzo Interrogation

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Filed Under (Fitness, Interviews) by Rick Kaselj on 06-07-2012

I am very excited to announce this: one of the contributors for the next edition of MIR is John Izzo.

I have known John for a few years now and have enjoyed his products (Shatterproof Spine and Lunging to Improved Performance).

This is one of the hip stability exercises that I got from his Lunging to Improved Performance DVD, which I really like:

Izzo Glute Exercise

Izzo Glute Exercise Description

I know some people at EFI don’t know John, so I asked if he could do a quick Question and Answer session with me.

Have a read below, and if you have any questions for John, please leave them in the comment area.

Rick – John, some people might not know who you are. Could you take a minute to give people a bit of a background? 

Rick, thanks for taking the time to do this interview with me. I wear many “fitness hats”. I have been a personal trainer since 1999. Having worked in commercial, corporate, non-profit, and private fitness facilities, I have served as a fitness director and training director.

In 2010, I finally started my own small business doing personal training, simply titled IZZOstrength. I have written articles for online publication over the years and have contributed to various NASM educational materials. I am also an educator that teaches classes for a major certification organization since 2002.

My love for weight-training began early in life and has really enabled me to find a stable passion coaching others. Currently, I train my own clients at my facility and I also manage/train golfers at a private country club.

Rick – You and I, as experienced personal trainers, know the importance of assessment. How do you incorporate assessment with your group training clients?

Performing assessments with one on one clients is simple. I use the NASM overhead profile test for possible dysfunctions–but I don’t limit myself to it at all. I use it to confirm what I find during certain movements. When it comes to group training, it tends to be somewhat tedious keeping a watchful eye on 4-5-10-15 bodies.

Typically, during group classes, the warm up is the initial method I use to assess certain “benchmarks” in my clients.

The big benchmarks are:

  • knee valgus/varus
  • protracted shoulders
  • pelvic tilt
  • foot position.

Because of the nature of my class flow, I am constantly attentive to what my clients can do.

In a group setting, I tend to separate what a client can do normally (what’s normal to them) and optimally (what I try to accomplish). My assessing never ends because I am looking for improvements in these 4 aspects.

There are many other things I look for that come under my radar during exercise execution like:

  • over-active traps (shrugging up on face-pulls)
  • degree of hip extension
  • core bracing
  • most of all—coach-ability

I ask myself: How tentative are my participants?

That is very important and if they are not receiving my coaching adequately, I need to do a better job instructing them. So, I evaluate my coaching cues, directions, and class circuit.

In a group setting, observation is the best assessment. I can’t tell you how many times I find that trainers stop paying attention in boot camp classes and simply focus on fatigue. If you know what to look for, observational assessment is an ongoing process. I really adopt JC Sanatana’s philosophy, “every exercise is an assessment”.

Rick – There is a big focus on corrective exercise and addressing muscle imbalances. How does that incorporate into your training programs with your clients and group sessions?

What I typically do is begin with learning what the client does most of the day.

Next, I eyeball their posture.

From there, we perform the opposite positions of what they do all day.

No client in my facility ever performs exercises sitting. We do all standing exercise (shoulder presses, cable presses, woodchops, etc).

I incorporate treadmill or versaclimber work for people that sit all day. We isolate inhibited muscles during rest periods (band walks between sets of a compound exercise). We perform 90% closed-chain exercises. Teaching clients the important of using the ground as a force lever is the first thing they learn when it comes to body awareness.

We also address muscle imbalances in the warm up/movement prep; but mostly it is incorporated into active recovery periods. With groups, I tend to put corrective work in a circuit as a “rest” if the circuit is made up of primarily of difficult exercises.

For instance, if there is a 4 exercise circuit that contains sled dragging, lunging, push-ups–then I will include something simple like angled low trap raises or band external rotation.

Rick – You are one of the few personal trainers that actually blogs and write training concepts to other personal trainers. How did the blog start out and why do you do it?

I started online in 2005 with my first website titled standapartfitness.com. That website is no longer, and then I created Trainer Advice because I was receiving a lot of emails from new trainers that needed direction. Being a hiring manager and teaching students, I am usually hit with topics that are really not covered by others.

If you notice, I am not one to create exercise programs to people online. I am solicited for programs, but I RARELY give specific advice because I don’t believe in giving people that don’t work with me–personally or exclusively– advice without meeting or assessing.

Trainer Advice was a blog that became popular simply because people were liking the advice I was giving. I’ve hired and fired trainers since 2005; so I tend to educate them on the “intangibles” of personal training: interview process, client retention, selling, self-respect, peer acceptance, and exercise program fruition. I have gained respect and notoriety for “being real”. And I am grateful to be regarded as a trainer that spreads “real” advice.

Most of the info you get nowadays is wateedr-down, copied, or repeated.

God knows…now everyone gives trainers advice, writes books, or proclaims to be a guru.

I like to think that I “really do” and have been since 2005.

My blog posts are simple because I love to write. Rarely do I research stuff for a blog post. Blogs to me, are meant to be fun and easy to write.

If I am going to spend time to research, I am going to submit the article for compensation. I have a life to live and don’t have time to research simple blog posts. That’s why I only write about things that I know about and feel are important to cover.

Rick – What would be the biggest tip that you would give a trainer that has to train their first golfer?

I am fortunate enough to work closely with a massage therapist. With that being said, when I meet with a golfer—it is typically a male that sits in his office all day and needs to get out to meet with the guys, or make some dealings over a game of golf. These men are usually stiff, immobile, and over the age of 50.

I tend to always persuade them to get regular massage therapy in order to manipulate the tissue a bit, so that I can go in and help them with stretching. I have found in my dealings with golfers, most men need flexibility and most women need more strength.

Rick – You have a warm-up component to your group training. What does that look like?

Warm up for my group training looks something like this:

  • Arm circles 20x per direction Toy Soldiers (in place) 20 per side
  • Reverse Lunges in Place 10 per side
  • Jumping Jacks 15x
  • Behind the back Chest/Rib Cage Stretch
  • Toe Touch Ham Stretch

And then we are off.

The first circuit of my group training class is typically easy and geared to “prepare” their bodies for the forthcoming, more challenging circuits.

Rick: What are the other components in your group training sessions?

I like to integrate a boxing component. People that have stressful jobs want to release that stress and it can come by way of punching a bag or punching the mitts with me. Typically, my class likes to hit the mitts with me because I tend to egg them on 🙂

I also include a metabolic circuit at the very end of the session.

With smaller groups I will place everyone on a piece of equipment and we will perform an “all out” effort on each piece for 30-45 seconds which includes:

  • Versaclimber
  • Treadmill sprints
  • AirDyne
  • Rower
  • Mountain Climbers
  • Jump Rope
  • Battling Ropes

Another component is stretching. At the end when all my participants are tired, their reward is some stretching to relax and reflect on their effort. I think at this time, we make a connection with each other and leave the facility feeling great!

Rick: Do you have a tip for fitness professionals that are blogging or are planning to blog? 

Do it because you want to do it (write)..don’t do it because you have this belief that you will make money, become popular, or validate your status in the industry.

If you like to write, start a blog.

If writing is not your strong suit, then forget blogging and try videos on YouTube.

If you have an original thought and something helpful to provide to readers, do your best and keep at the blog. If it’s something great and worthy, it will be shared by many.

Thanks so much, John.

If you like this QnA, make sure to check out the QnA that John did with me on his site.  You can check it out here.

Rick Kaselj, MS

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How to Get Medical Referrals with Michael Y. Seril

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Filed Under (Fitness, Interviews, Medical Referals) by Rick Kaselj on 11-06-2012

Last week, I was talking to a friend and she was saying how busy she is.

She has a full training schedule.

The cool thing is almost all of her clients are injury clients.  She is the only person in her area that focuses in on this niche.

Every day she is getting calls from lawyers, doctors and referrals from friends for her services.

If you are looking at getting more training clients, think about specializing on clients with injuries.  It is a huge opportunity that most fitness professionals just ignore.

Now today, I have an interview with a trainer who has developed strong relationships with his medical community.

This has led to him being the go-to fitness professional in his area and to a steady stream of injury clients.

Make sure to take the time to listen to this interview or download it and listen to it in the car.

Enjoy the interview!

CLICK HERE to listen to the interview with Michael Y. Seril on How Fitness Professionals Can Help the Medical Community.

CLICK HERE to listen to the interview with Michael Y. Seril on How Fitness Professionals Can Help the Medical Community.

What  Michael Y. Seril Shares in the Interview: 

  • Who is Michael Y. Seril?
  • How did he start getting medical referrals?
  • The power and opportunity of doing community presentations.
  • Why you should have a media kit?
  • What were the steps he took to get clients through medical referrals?
  • Doctors are not the only medical referrals.  There are others that refer to fitness professionals.
  • Patients and clients talk about you to their doctor.
  • Shares the benefits that fitness professionals can get in working with medical community.
  • What professions other than doctors should fitness professionals connect with.
  • Discussed the importance of education and certifications in terms of fitness to better help your clients get the results they need and for your business to grow.
  • How he incorporates medical referrals into his business
  • What are the common mistakes that fitness professionals make in terms of connecting with medical service providers in getting referrals?
  • Shares some tips on what fitness professionals can do to effectively connect with the medical community.

A few things you need to know about listening to the interview:

  • To listen to the interview, scroll down to the bottom of this page and click the play button symbol. If you do not have time to listen to it right now, just click the “download” button and download it to your computer. Then you can listen to it on your computer when you like.
  • Also the interview is up on iTunes. You can listen to it HERE or subscribe to the itunes podcast and get all the interviews when they are ready. Enjoy!
  • If you use Chrome as your web browser, at times it can act up when playing the interview. I would suggest listening to the interview in another web browser (Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer, etc.)
  • Here is a video explaining how to download the interview recording

If you have a neat specialization or business information that would be of benefit for fitness professionals to know about, please do contact me and I would love to share it with the EFI world.

If you know of a fitness professional that may benefit from this, please forward it onto them.

Take care.

Rick Kaselj, MS

P.S. – If you liked this kind of interview, here are some other interviews that may help you:

 

 

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Incorporating Nutritional Cleansing and Replenishing Products into Your Clients Program with Cari Lee Stevens

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Filed Under (General, Health, Interviews) by Rick Kaselj on 18-05-2012

Today is a little bit of a fitness business interview.

Enjoy the interview!

CLICK HERE to listen to the interview with Cari Lee Stevens on Incorporating Nutritional Cleansing and Replenishing Products into Your Client’s Program.

 

CLICK HERE to listen to the interview with Cari Lee Stevens on Incorporating Nutritional Cleansing and Replenishing Products into Your Client’s Program.

What Cari Lee Stevens  Shares in the Interview on Incorporating Nutritional Cleansing and Replenishing Products into Your Client’s Program: 

  • Who is Cari Lee Stevens?
  • How her personal experience as a trainer led her to a better understanding of the importance of proper nutrition
  • The negative impacts of skipping meals and how it affected her life and her job
  • How she used her illness as a turning point in changing her bad eating habits and making her business grow
  • What is nutritional cleansing?
  • How she started incorporating detoxification and cleansing in her business to help her clients in attaining better health
  • Importance of introducing new nutrition products to your clients
  • Information about her Isagenix business and how it works

A few things you need to know about listening to the interview:

  • To listen to the interview, scroll down to the bottom of this page and click the play button symbol. If you do not have time to listen to it right now, just click the “download” button and download it to your computer. Then you can listen to it on your computer when you like.
  • Also the interview is up on iTunes. You can listen to it here or subscribe to the itunes podcast and get all the interviews when they are ready. Enjoy!
  • If you use Chrome as your web browser, at times it can act up when playing the interview. I would suggest listening to the interview in another web browser (Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer, etc.)
  • Here is a video explaining how to download the interview recording

If you have a neat specialization or business information that would be of benefit for fitness professionals to know about, please do contact me and I would love to share it with the EFI world.

If you know of a fitness professional that may benefit from this, please forward it onto them.

Take care.

Rick Kaselj, MS

P.S. – If you liked this kind of interview, here are some other articles that may interest you:

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The Mature Market: The Fitness Industry Perfect Storm

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Filed Under (Fitness, Interviews, Medical Referals) by Rick Kaselj on 02-05-2012

Unfortunately very few professionals in the fitness industry have any idea this storm is upon us.

Even though many of us have been sounding the alarm, most have listened politely and nodded their heasd at all the right times. But they still just don’t get it. Maybe they thought it was just going to be a passing shower.

 

We might get a little wet but for the most part it will be business as usual.

But this is not your casual sprinkle. This is a full on downpour. A torrential rain. A deluge. And many are going to be swept under by the coming flood. Maybe right now you are wondering if your business will be ready for this next wave. There are four factors that we believe will create this Perfect Storm.

  1. A huge population.
  2. Lots of discretionary spending power.
  3. Incredible interest in staying healthy.
  4. Low competition.

These are the four realities of the Mature Market. On the upside this provides you with an amazing opportunity for financial independence and lifestyle freedom IF you run your fitness business the right way. We believe this actually provides a tremendous opportunity to attract more of the clients whom you can really have a positive impact on for years to come.

There are numerous business advantages to targeting the mature market that we could share but none are as powerful as an incredible phenomenon that we call “The Spillover Effect”.

This one benefit alone has the ability to multiply your business ten-fold and give you a distinct competitive advantage over all the other trainers in your area. This Spillover is just the kind of Perfect Storm you have been looking for, but you have to know how to tap into it.

One of the fears that many trainers have in building their business around an older clientele is that they will lose their current younger clients or will be viewed as the “senior citizen” program. So they see focusing on the mature client as a potential negative to their business.

However, if done correctly you can completely flip it on its head and make the mature focus a magnet for attracting younger clients that we likely never would have otherwise.

How is that possible? Let us explain.

There are many people of all ages who share some very similar characteristics when it comes to joining a fitness facility. What do these groups below have in common with the 55+ population?

1. Middle-aged women who want to lose a little weight and feel better about themselves;
2. Men and women with physical challenges or injuries;
3. Those suffering from chronic health problems such as arthritis, low back pain, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, fibromyalgia and  obesity;
4. The millions of adults who did not play sports in high school or college and have never worked out before.

Answer: All of them are looking for a comfortable, supportive, non-competitive place to work out where they will get high-quality instruction and can build their confidence.

By focusing on the needs and desires of the mature market you create an environment that is also very attractive to all of these other groups as well. This is The Spillover Effect at work. Your efforts with the 55+ population will essentially “spill over” to these other groups and it will be much, much easier to attract them, too.

We know this to be true because we have used this effect to our advantage magnificently and have built a large and continually growing clientele of folks who “would never step foot in a gym” (their words) or who went somewhere else only to be completely dissatisfied with the environment or have needs that are beyond the abilities of most places and knew we could help them (many with recommendations from their physicians).

While the sweaty, hard-body ideal has been the calling card of the fitness industry for a long time now (thanks to our bodybuilding roots) most people find this to be a turnoff to some degree and there is a complete disconnect between how they view themselves and those images. So by building your business around the mature market you naturally eliminate 90% of the barriers that many other people have for joining a center or studio.

  • There won’t be any pumped-up meatheads wearing string tanks, throwing around heavy weights and grunting.
  • No fitness divas in spandex shorts and revealing sports bra (up and out) showing off their lean legs and abs.
  • No more intimidating equipment, ‘no-pain no-gain’ attitudes, or obnoxious music.
  • No more supermodel ideal body types that people can’t even hope to achieve.
  • No more gallon jugs of water, weight-lifting straps or massive weight belts with superman logos (who really wants that in their facility anyway).

We must create everything for our clients instead of for ourselves. Removing these elements is only the first step towards shaping an environment that can meet the needs of all of these groups, but it is a critical one.

There will always be a place for hard-core, youth-focused programs, studios and facilities. BUT the population of potential clients is shrinking and the competition is growing.

However, the population of mature adults as well as all the groups mentioned above are growing rapidly and there is very little competition.

So which do you think will drive the fitness industry in the near future?

In 2012 the oldest baby boomers are turning 67, the youngest by some definitions 48. If we think back to the fitness boom and the real birth of the personal training industry in the 1980s and 1990s, it was fueled by boomers in their then 30s and 40s.

The fitness industry has continued to stay focused on youth, while the mature market that first created demand for it, is now often an afterthought. The segment of the marketplace that has the most need for personal training, and has the most financial resources is often overlooked entirely by the fitness industry.

So what should one do to tap into this ever growing up tapped market?

On the fitness side you need to:

• Become skilled at training mature clients for health and functional outcomes
• Gain credentials and expertise in exercise as a tool for disease prevention and management
• Specialize in one or more areas of concern to older adults (e.g. Balance and Fall Prevention; Post-Rehabilitation)
• Learn advanced assessments for function, balance, health, posture and more
• Run Small Group Training Programs in addition to 1-1 training

On the business side you need to:

• Tailor everything about your facility (look, feel, equipment, staff) to attract and serve this market
• Learn contemporary lead generation strategies
• Establish a strong presence online with a squeeze page, email opt-in for a free “thing” (report, video, assessment, training, etc.) and low “leakage”
Use social media such as Facebook, email, and blogging to establish a relationship with potential clients
• Have a strong closing script that connects with the values of the mature adult
• Offer long-term (6 month or more) training programs built on recurring revenue (monthly EFT)
• Provide excellent customer service

Don’t let this incredible opportunity pass you by. You can create a secure future filled with financial and lifestyle freedom but you’ve got to be willing to be different from all the other trainers around you. Forget the 20 and 30 year old clientele that everyone else is going after. Set yourself apart by focusing on the fast-growing 55+ population. They’re here. They’ve got the money. They’re interested in staying healthy. Are you ready for them?

About the Author – Dan Ritchie PhD, CSCS, HFI-ACSM

Dan has a broad background in the fitness industry including training and management in commercial and university/hospital-based fitness, for-profit, not-for-profit, and educational facilities. His primary areas of expertise are in personal training for special populations: athletes, pregnancy, blind, stroke recovery, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, Fibromyalgia, Alzheimers, etc. He has worked with Division I athletes, some of whom have been professionally drafted. He has also worked on state funded research on exercise for severe dementia alzheimers type. He regularly presents at national and regional conferences and has been active on committees for the American College of Sports Medicine. In May of 2008 he completed his Ph.D. in Health and Kinesiology, with a minor in Gerontology at Purdue University.

If you are a fitness professional and would like to tap into the mature market, Dan can help you do that in his Booming PT Profits:

Rick Kaselj, MS

P.S. – If you liked the above, Dr. Dan Ritchie has a number of other great resources on EFI:

How to Attract and Not Repel Baby Boomer Clients to Your Fitness Business with Dan Ritchie

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Filed Under (Fitness, Fitness Education, Interviews, Medical Referals) by Rick Kaselj on 23-04-2012

Another interview for you.  The focus is on the business side of fitness.  It is an interview with Dr. Dan M. Ritchie.

I was talking to Dan about his business when I was in California last month.  He explained how his business has changed.  He started a gym that was for everyone and then he shifted that business to just focusing on baby boomers.

In the interview he shares with you why he shifted his gym to focus on baby boomers, steps to make in order make your business more appealing to baby boomers, and the opportunity to focus on baby boomers in your fitness business.

Okay, let’s get to the interview.

Enjoy the interview!

CLICK HERE to listen to the interview with Dr. Dan M. Ritchie.

CLICK HERE to listen to the interview with Dr. Dan M Ritchie

In the Interview with Dan Ritchie on Attracting Baby Boomer Clients, he shares with you:

  • The common mistakes of fitness professionals in marketing to baby boomers
  • How baby boomers are approaching retirement differently than past generations
  • Why baby boomers have been the main group that has driven our economy
  • Why six pack abs and fat loss are not the focus of most baby boomers and what they are looking for
  • How big the opportunity for fitness professionals in work with baby boomers is
  • Baby boomers are looking for results training but not measured by the weight scale
  • What fitness professionals can do to make their fitness business more appealing to baby boomers.
  • What groups you can train with baby boomers and what groups you can not train with them.
  • The advantages of having educational experiences and specializations in attracting baby boomer clients.
  • How he ended up focusing on personal fitness training with Baby Boomers
  • His views about Title IX, how it affected baby boomer females, and its effect on the fitness industry.
  • What kind of marketing do baby boomers respond well to and which methods do not work
  • Where the fitness industry is shifting in the future
  • Importance of understanding the needs of your primary and secondary market when it comes to fitness programs
  • Few tips to fitness professionals on working with baby boomers
  • Who is Dan?
  • Who are Baby Boomers?

A few things you need to know about listening to the interviews:

  • To listen to the interview, scroll down to the bottom of this page and click the play button symbol. If you do not have time to listen to it right now, just click the “download” button and download it to your computer. Then you can listen to it on your computer when you like.
  • Also the interview is up on iTunes. You can listen to it here or subscribe to the itunes podcast and get all the interviews when they are ready. Enjoy!
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  • Here is a video explaining how to download the interview recording

If you want to learn more about Dr Dan Ritchie and see what balance screen and exercise program he uses plus the business stuff he uses to attract baby boomer client’s into this fitness business, you can check out Booming PT Profits.

If you have a neat specialization or business information that would be of benefit for fitness professionals to know about, please do contact me and I would love to share it with the EFI world.

If you know of a fitness professional that may benefit from this, please forward it onto them.

Take care.

Looking forward to getting  your feedback on the interview.

Rick Kaselj, MS

P.S. – If you liked this kind of interview, here are some other articles that may interest you:

 

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