• Home
  • About Rick
  • Courses
  • Products
  • Services
  • Contact
  • Survey

How to Effectively Train Clients in a Small Space… Without pissing everyone off.

0

Filed Under (Fitness, General) by Rick Kaselj



The clock strikes chaos. You have been training clients back to back all afternoon, roaming free and dominating the gym space.

As the after work crowd charges towards the squat rack, your heart rate skyrockets.

Seems like the room just got a whole lot smaller.

Embrace the mayhem.

As a private trainer in New York, working in close quarters is simply part of getting the job done. You have to roll with it, or your business will fail.

However, how to train effectively in small space is one of the most overlooked considerations for trainers.

To be successful training clients in small gyms, you must understand the unspoken rules of working with limited space.

5 Tips on How to Train Your Clients with Limited Space – AND get results.

1. Be Prepared AND Flexible

Prepare for the worst, hope for the best.

It goes without saying you must be prepared for every client training session. However, it must be a draft game plan. This is one big mistake I see trainers make all the time, who feel they must follow exactly what the sheet says. Let’s face it, nothing ever goes exactly to plan, even your own workouts.

Think about the movement patterns you want to focus on and plan your exercise selection around this – then adjust it according to the space and equipment available. This is why it’s essential to have an excellent knowledge base of exercise progressions and substitutions in your HEAD. Referring to paper notes throughout the session is amateurish.

As a back up plan, you must have a series of efficient go-to movements that you can add into any program, anytime the space becomes too crowded. For example, one of my favorite go-to metabolic sequences that can be modified for most clients is a Bodyweight Mash Up. You can do 2-3 rounds, depending on your situation and space constraints.

  • Prisoner Squats – 30 seconds
  • Walk out to push ups – 30 seconds
  • Alternating reverse lunges – 30 seconds
  • Mountain climbers – 30 seconds
  • Jumping jacks – 30 seconds

2. Consider Other Trainers and Your Client

Awareness of other trainers sharing the space with your client is a key factor to effective training in a small gym. Anticipate how much room your client will need to perform an exercise so you don’t interfere with anyone else and obviously, to avoid injury.

Courteous gestures go a long way. If you are not sure if a trainer is using a piece of equipment, just ask. This goes for cleaning up after yourself too – there is no room for equipment to be left lying around.

If you are new to working in a certain space, respect the trainers who are already working there. Too many times I’ve seen meatheads stroll onto the floor, thinking they own it, and pissing everyone off. Don’t be that guy.

Respect your client. Some clients will feel self-conscious, and certain exercises will not be appropriate. I never get my clients to do an exercise I wouldn’t feel comfortable doing myself. You want your client to trust you, feel comfortable and never threatened.

And listen, sitting on a bench and texting while your client works hard is not acceptable. This is not only lazy, but you are wasting precious space.

3. Hold Your Space (Get Physical if You Have To)

Spreading yourself out all over the gym is totally fine IF it’s quiet.

When the space is crowded, hold your area. This is not the time to set up a cool Tough Mudder obstacle course. Save it for another day.

Like I said, instead of floating all over the gym keep your client in one area and bring the equipment you need to the client BEFORE you start. You know the weight your client can lift, so be ready. Chunk exercises together that flow smoothly.

It’s unnecessary to get out chalk and literally draw the line (even though I’ve seriously considered doing this). Remember, it is inappropriate to cut in front of people and invade other people’s personal space. As the trainer, you direct and control where you want your client to stand or lie down. Avoid dangerous positioning. Be confident in your manner – and your client will follow your lead.

4. Be One Step Ahead

Always think about the NEXT exercise your client will do in the workout. Plan ahead and move accordingly.

Anticipate how your client is feeling, and be responsive to their cues. An example is if they develop unusual soreness or tightness during a session. Again, you need to adapt the workout to their needs. Don’t ever be caught fishing for the next exercise, your client will notice and question your ability.

5. Focus on the Flow

The secret to an effective workout in a small space is perfecting the flow. I’m not going all yoga on you, but a confident flow involves transitioning and progressing one movement to the next. Maintaining this workout flow will make it appear seamless and well planned. Utilizing the equipment you have will ensure smooth transitions and enhance the effectiveness of the session.

You want to start out with dynamic moves, to increase range of motion and prepare for the movements you will train. Avoid starting with destructive plyometric moves that you might see on certain home workout DVD’s. This will empty the tank in the first five minutes, which overall is not beneficial and your client will hate you.

Dragging your client all over the gym and resting too much between sets disrupts flow, as does meaningless chit-chat. I’m not anti-chatting, but there is a time and place for it. Train hard, then chat.

Some of these points may seem very common sense to you, however you would be surprised the number of folks who completely disregard others in small gym spaces. Not only is this frustrating as a trainer, but unfair to clients who pay top dollar for your expertise.

It may seem daunting to be confined to a limited workout space, however being creative will challenge your client, get results and keep them coming back for more.

I have actually put together 31 NEW Fat Loss Accelerators you can simply plug into your client training sessions now, which can work in any small space and requires only minimal equipment. This means you don’t have to sit down and put together go-to metabolic sequences, for when the space is crowded. I have done the work for you.

Click here to check out my new Accelerators.

A happy, lifelong client is one who gets what he/she wants – results. While training in small spaces can be a headache, your workouts will be effective and successful if you keep these simple tips in mind.

Be awesome,

Kate Vidulich, BSc, ACSM HFS
Creator of Fat Loss Accelerators

P.S. – If you liked this post from Kate, you should check this one out:

Facebook comments:

Write a comment

*