What Butler University, the NCAA and Basketball Injuries Have In Common?


I am in Indianapolis for the NCAA March Madness Final Four.

Today is the final between Butler University Bulldogs and the Duke Blue Devils.

Since Butler University is in Indianapolis, the city is going crazy.

While I was walking around Butler University, I bumped into one of the Butler University Cheerleaders.

I was hoping to run into Gordon Hayward or the Brad Stevens (the coach).

After visiting Butler University we headed to the pep rally that Butler University had in downtown Indianapolis.

Here is a video clip from the Butler University Pep Rally:

Okay, let me get to injuries stuff.

There has been a lot of talk on the sports channels about college basketball injuries.

Here a few that were talked about at the Final Four:

– Da’Sean Butler of West Virgina suffered an ACL tear
– Matt Howard of Butler University got a minor concussion
– Shelvin Mack of Butler University suffered from dehydration
– Da’Sean Butler of Michigan State suffered an ankle sprain

All of these injuries got me thinking if injuries have increased in NCAA basketball.

All of these basketball injuries seemed more frequent than in the past.

I hit the research books to see what they had to say.

I came across two great articles that highlighted injury trends in NCAA men’s and women’s basketball injuries.

This is what was found when looking at NCAA Men’s Basketball injuries over the last 16 years:

– 60% of all injuries were to the lower extremity
– ankle ligament sprains are the most common injury overall
– knee internal derangements was the injury that caused athletes to miss more than 10 days of participation
– increasing incidence of injuries to the head and face have occurred due to the increase in physical contact in the sport
– ankle ligament sprains and knee internal derangements maybe partially preventable with taping, bracing and neuromuscular training

I found these results very interesting.

It was excellent to see that neuromuscular training is recommended as an exercise program that can help decrease lower body injuries like ankle and knee injuries.  I do go through this during the Balance Training for the Rehab Client course.

There was a second article that looked at the injuries in NCAA Women’s Basketball.  This is what they found:

– injuries in games were almost 2 times higher than in practice
– preseason-practice injury rates were more twice as high as regular-season practice
– most common game injuries are: ankle ligament sprains, knee injuries (internal derangements and patellar conditions), and concussions.
– most common practices injuries are: ankle ligament sprains, knee injuries (internal derangements and patellar conditions), upper leg muscle-tendon strains, and concussions
– preseason conditioning with a focus on proper training may reduce the risk of injury and can optimize performance.
– as both player size and the speed of the women’s game continue to increase in the rate of concussions and other high-energy trauma

It was interesting to see the rise in both men and women basketball.

I go through a lot of great knee injury exercises in a past webinar.  CLICK HERE for more info.

Okay, I got to head off to the NCAA Championship game.

Talk to you soon.

For More Info

Dick R, Hertel J, Agel J, Grossman J, Marshall SW. (2007). Descriptive epidemiology of collegiate men’s basketball injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988-1989 through 2003-2004. J Athl Train. 2007 Apr-Jun;42(2):194-201.

Agel J, Olson DE, Dick R, Arendt EA, Marshall SW, Sikka RS. (2007). Descriptive epidemiology of collegiate women’s basketball injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988-1989 through 2003-2004.  J Athl Train. 2007 Apr-Jun;42(2):202-10.

Rick Kaselj, MS

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