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Hip Pain in Athletes: What’s the Scoop?

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Filed Under (General) by Rick Kaselj

Today, I am back with another post from Eric Cressey.

It has to do with hip pain.

Enjoy the article!

Take it away, Eric.

Rick Kaselj

P.S. – If you missed yesterday’s article, you can check it out here.

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Over the past few years, there has been a huge rise in hip injuries in athletes. Sports hernias, labral tears, and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) are commonplace findings on the health histories that I see every day on first-time evaluations. In case you’re not familiar with this term, with FAI, you can have bony overgrowth of the femoral head (cam), acetabulum (pincer), or both (mixed), as the graphic from Lavigne et al. below demonstrates:

femoroacetabular impingement Hip Pain in Athletes: What’s the Scoop?

And beyond injuries that are actually observed and reported, you can find something “wrong” with just about every athlete’s hips if you just do some diagnostic imaging.

Silvis et al. (2011) found that 77% of asymptomatic collegiate and professional hockey players had “findings of hip or groin pathologic abnormalities” on MRI.

Larson et al. (2013) reported that 87% of high-level college football hips imaged had findings consistent with FAI, but only 31% of those hips presented with actual symptoms. Not surprisingly, the more bony overgrowth present, the higher the likelihood of symptoms.

Some folks say that diagnostic imaging and functional tests are improving and that’s why the prevalence has increased in recent years. In other words, some people are asserting that we’ve always had significant hip “abnormalities,” but we just learned to clearly define them.

Let’s stop and think about that, though, folks: if we had hip pain and dysfunction on this level for decades, don’t you think anecdotal evidence would have at least tipped us off? I find it hard to believe that generations of athletes would have just rubbed some dirt on a painful hip and bear with it for decades.

To draw a parallel, consider shoulders in those over the age of 60. Sher et al.(1995) reported that a whopping 54% of asymptomatic shoulders in this age group have rotator cuff tears; again, that doesn’t even include those who actually have pain! Why does this happen? They impinge over and over again on the undersurfaced of the acromion process secondary to poor thoracic (upper back) positioning, scapular (shoulder blade) control, and rotator cuff function.

back Hip Pain in Athletes: What’s the Scoop?

The end result is reactive changes on the acromion process that lay down more and more bone as the years go on. And, an anteriorly tilted scapula kicks that impingement up a notch. The “early” cuff irritation likely comes in those with Type 3 (beak-shaped) acromions, whereas the Type 1 (flat) and Type 2 (hook) acromions need time to lay down more and more bone for their anterior tilt to bring them to threshold.

acromion Hip Pain in Athletes: What’s the Scoop?

This closely parallels the pincer overgrowth we see on the acetabulum, but you can also get bony changes on the humeral head, just as you would on the femoral head. Shoulders and hips aren’t that different, are they?

Bringing our focus back to FAI, it’s widely debated whether those with FAI are born with it, or whether it becomes part of “normal” development in some kids. World-renowned hip specialist Marc Phillipon put that debate to rest with a 2013 study that examined how the incidence of FAI changed across various stages of youth hockey. At the PeeWee (10-12 years old) level, 37% had FAI and 48% had labral tears. These numbers went to 63% and 63% at the Bantam level (ages 13-15), and 93% and 93% at the Midget (ages 16-19) levels, respectively. The longer one played hockey, the messier the hip – and the greater the likelihood that the FAI would “chew up” the labrum.

I’d estimate that over 90% of the femoroacetabular impingement cases I’ve seen have come in hockey, soccer, and baseball players. What do these sports have in common? They all live in anterior pelvic tilt – with hockey being the absolute worst. Is it any surprise that the incidence of FAI and associated hip issues has increased dramatically since the AAU generation rolled in and kids played the same sport all 12 months of the year?

Conversely, I’ve never seen a case of FAI in a cyclist. Why? It’s likely because they live in lumbar flexion and a greater degree of posterior pelvic tilt. And, taking it a step further, I’ve never seen an athlete with FAI whose symptoms didn’t improve by getting into a bit more posterior pelvic tilt.

Finally, a 2009 study by Allen et al. demonstrated that in 78% of cases of cam impingement symptoms in one hip, the cam-type femoroacetabular impingement was bilateral (they also found pincer-type FAI on the opposite side in 42% of cases). If this was just some “chance” occurrence, I find it hard to believe that it would occur bilaterally in such a high percentage of cases. Excessive anterior pelvic tilt (sagittal plane) would be, in my eyes, what seems to bring it about the most quickly, and problems in the frontal and transverse planes are likely to blame for why one side presents with symptoms before the other.

People have tried to blame the increased incidence of hip injuries on resistance training. My personal opinion is that you can’t blame resistance training for the incidence, but rather the rate at which these issues reach threshold. Quality resistance training could certainly provide the variety necessary to prevent these reactive changes from occurring at a young age, or by creating a more ideal pelvic alignment to avoid a FAI hip from reaching threshold.

Conversely, a “clean-squat-bench” program is a recipe for living in anterior tilt – and squatting someone with a FAI is like overhead pressing someone with a full-thickness cuff tear; things get ugly quickly.

Honestly, this probably isn’t revolutionary for folks out there – particularly in the medical field – who have watched the prevalence of femoroacetabular impingement rise exponentially in recent years. However, what may seem revolutionary is the realization that an entire generation of young athletes have been so mismanaged that we’ve actually created a new classification of developmental problems and pathologies: femoroacetabular impingement, labral tears, and sports hernias.

How do we fix the problem?

First, we give young athletes more variety at a young age to ensure that they don’t live in these problematic positions year-round.

Second, we counsel them on what good posture really is – and it doesn’t look like this:

Posture Hip Pain in Athletes: What’s the Scoop?

Third, we make sure that their strength and conditioning programming is appropriate by training them out of this heavily extended pattern. This includes a big focus on the anterior core, glutes, serratus anterior, and lower traps through a combination of corrective exercises, positional breathing drills, and resistance training in the right positions.

While addressing an extension posture would be a very long article in itself, Eric has taken the guesswork out of things for you by providing both “Extension” and “Flexion” programs in his popular resource, The High Performance Handbook. This versatile resource begins with an easy-to-apply self-assessment component so that you can use the 16-week program to work on your unique issues while improving your health and performance. It’s on sale at a great discount this week only, click here for more details.

The High Performance Handbook by Eric Cressey Hip Pain in Athletes: What’s the Scoop?

Eric Cressey

Say Goodbye to Achy Elbows with this Exercise!

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Filed Under (General) by Rick Kaselj

Today, I wanted to go through a video about an exercise that you can do for achy elbows.

One of the causes for achy, sore, or painful elbows is weak grip strength. I wanted to go through a really easy exercise that you can do in your workouts. You can add it to your workouts, roughly twice a week. You are looking at going 30 feet with this Farmer’s Walk exercise.

Say Goodbye to Achy Elbows with this Exercise!

CLICK HERE to watch the YouTube video.

The Farmer’s Walk can be done in a wide variety of ways. If you’ll look online, you will see that there are Farmer’s Walk Bars or Farmer’s Walk Handles but most gyms don’t have them. If you are in a cross fit gym or a strong man gym, you might have those specific handles or bars. But what you will be able to find at your home gym or in your local gym are dumbbells, kettlebells and the barbell.

#1 – Farmer’s Walk with a Barbell

I am grabbing in the middle of the barbell and lifting it up. I am taking the barbell for a walk. I am looking at going roughly 30 feet, fifteen out and fifteen back.

Farmer’s Walk with a Barbell Say Goodbye to Achy Elbows with this Exercise!

Farmer’s Walk with a Barbell

The negative part of using a barbell is that there is such a long lever that you are going to work on to balance things out which can be a positive thing or can be a negative thing if it’s too much for your elbow and if it irritates your elbow pain.

#2 – Farmer’s Walk with a Kettlebell

I can take the kettlebell for a walk. It’s important to remember that I am not hunched over.

Farmer’s Walk with a Kettlebell Wrong Position Say Goodbye to Achy Elbows with this Exercise!

Farmer’s Walk with a Kettlebell (Wrong Position)

I am keeping it nice and square here. I am strong in the core as I take the kettlebell for a walk.

Farmer’s Walk with a Kettlebell Correct Position Say Goodbye to Achy Elbows with this Exercise!

 Farmer’s Walk with a Kettlebell (Correct Position)

I am looking for a weight that is really worth challenging to do and that I can really feel my core working and I can really feel my forearm working in order to hold things. You are looking at building up to a point where you can do roughly about 75% of your bodyweight if you are at a healthy bodyweight.

#3 – Farmer’s Walk with a Dumbbell

I can use a dumbbell and take it for a walk.

Farmer’s Walk with a Dumbbell Say Goodbye to Achy Elbows with this Exercise!

Farmer’s Walk with a Dumbbell

If you have achy elbows, give the Farmer’s Walk a go. I have given you three options that you can do. If you don’t have the Farmer’s Walk bars or handles, you can take the barbell, the kettlebell, or the dumbbell for a walk in order to improve your grip strength and that will ease things up when it comes to your elbow pain.

Make sure to swing by ExercisesForInjuries.com. Enter in your injury or pain. Good chances that I have an article, video or an interview that will help you overcome your injury or pain.

Secondly, if you are watching this on YouTube, head up above, hit “Subscribe”. What that will do is every couple of days you will get a video like this where I talk about tips and tricks on overcoming injury and pain.

Thirdly, head down below, leave me a “Like” or hit “Like” and leave me a question or comment.

If you are looking for exercises that can help you get rid of that nagging ache on your elbow or forearm, then check out Fixing Elbow & Forearm Pain System here:

Your Fixing Elbow Forearm Pain System Say Goodbye to Achy Elbows with this Exercise!

Take care!

Rick Kaselj, MS

Quick Fix for Elbow Pain When Doing Dumbbell Exercises

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Filed Under (General) by Rick Kaselj

In this video, I wanted to go through what to do if you get elbow pain when doing dumbbell exercises.

Quick Fix for Elbow Pain When Doing Dumbbell Exercises

CLICK HERE to watch the YouTube video.

There are 2 Tips that I can give you.

#1 – Swap out the Dumbbells for a Barbell

You can do your exercises utilizing the barbell so you can have help from both sides. Instead of things being isolated with the dumbbells and each arm having to work independently to do the exercise and do the movement, now you are getting assistance from both sides. If you have one side that is a little stronger than the other, it will be able to help the other side. That is your first option.

#2 – Use Wrist Straps or Lifting Straps

Using a Wrist Strap or a Lifting Strap Quick Fix for Elbow Pain When Doing Dumbbell Exercises

Using a Wrist Strap or a Lifting Strap

I can use either the wrist straps or lifting straps when I am using the dumbbells. I could put them on and wrap them around the dumbbells and tighten it up. By doing this, a lot of the load is put onto my wrist and I don’t have to work as hard in the grip to do the exercise. Now that I am not having to grip as hard with my hand and my fist, that will put less stress on the elbow joint.

If you are having elbow pain when utilizing the dumbbells when doing dumbbell exercise, you can do those quick things. You can swap out the dumbbells for the barbell or you can get the wrist straps or lifting straps while doing the dumbbell exercises to decrease how much grip strength you need which will decrease the stress on your elbows.

Make sure to swing by ExercisesForInjuries.com. Enter in your injury or pain like “elbow pain” and there is a good chance that I have an article, video or an interview that will help you overcome your injury or pain.

Secondly, if you are watching this on YouTube, head up above, hit “Subscribe”. What that will do is every couple of days you will get a video like this where I talk about tips and tricks on overcoming injury and pain.

Thirdly, head down below, hit “Like” and leave me a question or comment.

Here’s a quick and easy step-by-step guide that will finally end your elbow pain. Grab your own copy of the Fixing Elbow & Forearm Pain System here:

Your Fixing Elbow Forearm Pain System Quick Fix for Elbow Pain When Doing Dumbbell Exercises

Take care!

Rick Kaselj, MS.

3 Exercises to Skip If You Have Tennis Elbow

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Filed Under (General) by Rick Kaselj

In this video, I want to go through 3 exercises that you need to skip if you have golfer’s elbow or medial elbow pain.

3 Exercises to Skip If You Have Tennis Elbow

CLICK HERE to watch the YouTube video.

#1 – Straight Bar Bicep Curl

Straight Bar Bicep Curl 3 Exercises to Skip If You Have Tennis Elbow

Straight Bar Bicep Curl

You will utilize the barbell to do curls. This is one exercise that you should leave out because from curling up, the force in the bar wants to take you into extension bending the wrist back and you need to fight back to keep the wrist in neutral. You need to create a flexion force, curling force that puts more stress on that inside part of the elbow, medial elbow or golfer’s elbow.

#2 – Underhanded Barbell Row

Underhanded Barbell Row 3 Exercises to Skip If You Have Tennis Elbow

Underhanded Barbell Row

You are rowing up and then coming back. When rowing, the weight puts you into extension. You need to create a flexion force in order to complete the movement or prevent the weight from moving your wrist into extension that puts a lot of stress in your forearm and in the medial part of the elbow.

#3 – Chest Pec Fly Machine

Chest Pec Fly Machine 3 Exercises to Skip If You Have Tennis Elbow

Chest Pec Fly Machine

The third one is more of a machine that is usually found in weight lifting gym, bodybuilding gym, and rec centers called the Chest Pec Fly Machine. It is a machine that you sit in, grabbing the handles with arms straight, gripping handles, bringing out front and then coming back. The handles are trying to push you into extension and you are fighting the tension to keep the wrist in neutral. You created a flexion force that puts stress on the forearm and elbow.

If you have medial elbow pain or golfer’s elbow pain, make sure to cut out those three exercises that causes more damage and pain to your elbows.

Make sure to swing by ExercisesForInjuries.com and enter in your injury or pain. There is a good chance that I have an article, a video or an interview that will help you overcome your injury or pain. Secondly, if you are watching this on YouTube, head up above and hit “Subscribe”. What that will do is every couple of days you will get a video like this where I talk about overcoming injury and pain. Thirdly, head down below, hit “Like” and leave me a question or a comment.

If you want to eliminate your excruciating elbow pain for good, then check out then check out The Complete Fixing Elbow Pain System here:

The Complete Fixing Elbow Pain System 2.0 3 Exercises to Skip If You Have Tennis Elbow

Rick Kaselj, MS

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Number One Workout Mistake That is Wrecking Your Elbows

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Filed Under (General) by Rick Kaselj

In this video, I want to go through the Number One Workout Mistake that is Wrecking Your Elbows.

Number One Workout Mistake That is Wrecking Your Elbows

CLICK HERE to watch the YouTube video.

It is pretty common belief out there that when it comes to working out and workout programs, most of us focus way too much on pushing exercises and not enough rowing exercises. We need a 1:1 ratio of pushing to pulling or we have to do a 2:1 (2 exercises of pulling to 1 exercise of pushing). If you follow that belief especially if you make this mistake, you’re wrecking your elbows.

Now let me explain the mistake I did. I didn’t focus on HWFE which is super important when it comes to rolling or pulling movements to not wreck the elbows. Whenever you are doing any type of pulling or rolling movement, what you should do is have the hand in line with the wrist, the forearm, and the elbow.

When I was going through the rolling movement with an overhand grip and underhand grip, I didn’t focus on the hand, wrist, forearm and elbow. I was breaking that movement and was going into too much flexion. I was coming up, pulling and curling at the top. I am putting unnecessary stress on the elbows.

HWFE 300x243 Number One Workout Mistake That is Wrecking Your Elbows

HWFE

What I want to do is to make sure that while doing any type of pulling or rolling movement, I have the hand, wrist, forearm and elbows in good alignment. Focus on the movement that is happening in the shoulder blades, shoulder and back area.

Give that a go and try a couple of repetitions where you are over curling and see how your elbows feel. And then, do the right way focusing in your hand, wrist, forearm and elbows on a perfect nice straight line and see how your elbows feel. If you feel a little bit of elbow pain and if you don’t make any changes, you will end up getting full blown elbow pain.

Make sure to swing by ExercisesForInjuries.com and enter in your injury or pain. There is a good chance that I have an article, a video or an interview that will help you overcome your injury or pain. Secondly, if you are watching this on YouTube, head up above and hit “Subscribe”. What that will do is every couple of days you will get a video like this where I talk about tips and tricks on overcoming injury and pain. Thirdly, head down below, hit “Like” and leave me a question or a comment.

If you want to end your elbow pain and learn dozens of other secrets that will prevent it from coming back, then check out The Complete Fixing Elbow Pain System here:

The Complete Fixing Elbow Pain System 2.0 Number One Workout Mistake That is Wrecking Your Elbows

 

Rick Kaselj, MS

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Ins and Outs of Bodyweight Exercise with Todd Kuliskis – Part 1

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Filed Under (General) by Rick Kaselj

Today, I have a new video interview for you with Todd Kuliskis about the Ins and Outs of Bodyweight Exercise.

Check out the video below to learn more about bodyweight training.

Enjoy!

Rick Kaselj, MS

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Ins and Outs of Bodyweight Exercise with Todd Kuliskis – Part 1

CLICK HERE to watch the YouTube video.

Few of the Highlights from the Interview:

  • How Todd Kuliskis became a bodyweight training enthusiast?
  • Common causes of shoulder injuries
  • Bodyweight Training approach for beginners
  • What is Bodyweight Muscle Intensifier?
  • Bodyweight training mistakes
  • Injury prevention techniques when doing bodyweight exercises

I hope you enjoyed the interview.

If you would like more information on Todd Kuliskis, you can visit him at A Shot of Adrenaline.

If you know of someone that would be great to interview, please do email.

Or if you have an injury story or something that would benefit health and fitness professionals, please contact me.

If you are looking for more Bodyweight exercises that can transform your physique by helping you build muscle and lose body fat, then check out Bodyweight Bundle 2.0 here:

Bodyweight Bundle 2.0 by Todd Kuliskis Ins and Outs of Bodyweight Exercise with Todd Kuliskis   Part 1

Take care and have a great day.

Rick Kaselj, MS

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5 Stretches You Have To Do After You Run

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Filed Under (General) by Rick Kaselj

Well here on the west coast, things have heated up. 

The snow has melted and we are getting above 10 degrees Celsius. 

It is time to start thinking about dusting off the running shoes and getting outside.

Today, I have a guest post from Bayo on stretches you have to do after your run.

Take it away, Bayo!

Rick Kaselj, MS

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Hello, how are you guys doing?

My name is Bayo Adio from Kansas. I am a track and field coach, a certified personal trainer, and a running coach.

I have helped a lot of people run 5Ks and half marathon trainings and obstacle course races. But today, my goal is to share with you guys 5 stretches you need to be doing after your running.

5 Stretches You Have To Do After You Run

CLICK HERE to watch the YouTube video.

#1 – Hip Flexor and Psoas Stretch

You are going to go on the ground and get into a 90-90 degree angle.

If you want a deeper stretch, you need to lean a little bit more forward and that will help stretch your hip flexor. This muscle gets tight a lot when you run.

Hip Flexor and Psoas Stretch 5 Stretches You Have To Do After You Run

Hip Flexor and Psoas Stretch

You do it 20 seconds on the right and 20 seconds on the left, maybe two times or 30 seconds, either or.

#2 – Glute Muscle Stretch

Have one leg right above your knee and you can sit. You should already be feeling some sort of tightness that gets all the muscles right here.

Glute Muscle Stretch 5 Stretches You Have To Do After You Run

Glute Muscle Stretch

If you want a deeper stretch, you can go on your back, put your hands between the hole in your legs and just pull it closer and that will give you a nice deep stretch.

Glute Muscle Deep Stretch 5 Stretches You Have To Do After You Run

Glute Muscle Deep Stretch

#3 – Quadriceps Stretch

Quadriceps Stretch 5 Stretches You Have To Do After You Run

Quadriceps Stretch

Your quadriceps especially if you are running downhill and stuff, these muscles will get really tight as well. You want to hold on to a wall, if you need balance, just hold it for like 20 seconds on both sides of the legs.

#4 – Hamstring Stretch

Hamstring gets tight a lot of times. Go on the ground, there are different ways to stretch the hamstrings but I like this way better where your knees get straightened and just slowly go as far as you possibly can.

1st Hamstring Stretch 5 Stretches You Have To Do After You Run

1st Hamstring Stretch

Or you can also stay right here.

2nd Hamstring Stretch 5 Stretches You Have To Do After You Run

2nd Hamstring Stretch

Remember the goal is not to strain. The goal is to stretch it where you start to feel a little bit of stretch and just kind of hold it there. Again, try to do 30 seconds on both sides twice.

#5 – Shoulder Stretch

We do not think a lot about shoulder stretch when running. We are going to give you one simple stretch to put on your shoulders. Grab your elbow and just pull. Again pull for 20 seconds on your shoulder and also hold for another 20 seconds on the opposite shoulder.

Shoulder Stretch 5 Stretches You Have To Do After You Run

Shoulder Stretch

We don’t do a lot of stretching when we start running. We focus a lot on mobility and dynamic stretches and drills to get warmed up and walking. The static stretches, we saved those for after the run.

I hope you enjoyed the stretches. Thank you so much for watching. Remember, always commit to be a better you! Good luck with your running! Peace!

 If you are interested in running a 5K in 5 weeks without injury, then check this out….

Run a 5k in 5 weeks by Bayo Adio 5 Stretches You Have To Do After You Run

Bayo Adio

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How bodyweight Sequencing Can Help Improve Your Workout Results with Tyler Bramlett

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Filed Under (General) by Rick Kaselj

Today, I have another interview with Tyler Bramlett.

I have interviewed Tyler before but this time he is going to talk about his different approach to bodyweight training.

Check out the video below for the interview.

Enjoy!

Rick Kaselj, MS

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How bodyweight Sequencing Can Help Improve Your Workout Results with Tyler Bramlett

CLICK HERE to watch the YouTube video.

In the above interview, you will discover:

  • Tyler’s Bodyweight Training methods
  • How do patterns and sequences in bodyweight exercises work?
  • Benefits of bodyweight training seqeuncing
  • What is Dynamic Flexibility?
  • Effective way to improve flexibility
  • What is Intramuscular Coordination?
  • Benefits of using Intramuscular Coordination.

I hope you enjoyed the interview.

If you would like more information on Tyler Bramlett, you can visit him at GarageWarrior.com.

If you know of someone that would be great to interview, please do email.

Or if you have an injury story or something that would benefit health and fitness professionals, please contact me.

If you are looking for more bodyweight routines that can help you improve your flexibility, coordination and dramatically increase your overall calorie burn, then check out the Bodyweight Flow System here:

BW FLOW IMAGE Full Package With Bonuses How bodyweight Sequencing Can Help Improve Your Workout Results with Tyler Bramlett

Take care and have a great day.

Rick Kaselj, MS

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