6 Best Exercises to Fix Posterior Pelvic Tilt

If you lead a sedentary lifestyle, such as working all day sitting at a desk, you run the risk of developing posterior pelvic tilt. This condition occurs when the pelvis rises in the front and sags in the back. The muscles that are affected when someone has this condition include the abdominal muscles, glutes, and hamstrings. All of these, when not used enough, can put added stress on a person’s back. However, all is not lost as there are exercises, such as the six we detail below, that can help you reverse the development of posterior pelvic tilt.

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#1 – Glute Roll

Sit upright on the floor with your knees bent and your heels on the floor. Place the foam roller under your glutes and bring one ankle across the opposite knee. Engage your core and roll the foam roller from the bottom of your seat, to the top and back. Repeat the movement.

Glute Roll

Start with one set on each side, rolling for 30 seconds to 1 minute. The intensity of this exercise is light.


#2 – Hamstring Stretch

Begin in an upright standing position, maintaining proper alignment with your head, shoulders, hips and legs. Engage your core and hinge through your hips as you straighten one leg out front, pointing your toes toward the ceiling. Bend your upper body forward to intensify the stretch, holding this position for 20 to 30 seconds. Return to the starting position and repeat the movement on the opposite leg.

Hamstring Stretch

Start with 1 repetition on each side, holding for 20 to 30 seconds. The intensity of this exercise is light.


#3 – Cobra Up Dog

Cobra

Lie on your stomach with your feet shoulder-width apart, maintaining proper alignment with your head, shoulders, hips, and legs. Place your hands at your sides at chest level. Breathe in, then press up and arch your back. Use your back and core strength with minimal assistance from your arms. Hold this position for 20 to 30 seconds. Relax and return to the starting position.

Cobra

Start with 1 repetition, holding for 20 to 30 seconds. The intensity of this exercise is light.

Upward Dog

Move into a straight-arm plank position, maintaining proper alignment with your head, shoulders, hips and toes. Lower your hips to the ground, arching through your back to stretch the hips and low back area. Hold this position for a couple of seconds. Relax and return to the starting position.

Upward Dog


#4 – Squats

Begin in an upright standing position with your legs slightly more than hip-width apart and your toes slightly pointed outward. Hold the dumbbell in both hands at chest-height. Engage your core, then bend your knees and hinge through your hips to move into a squat position. Raise back up and repeat the movement.

Squats

Start with one set of 10 to 15 repetitions. The intensity of this exercise is light.


#5 – Back Extension

Lie on your stomach on top of the stability ball, with your knees on the floor and your hands at your ears. Tighten your core and raise your upper body by extending your lower back. Be careful not to extend your neck. Lower back down to return to the starting position and repeat the movement.

Back Extension

Start with 1 set of 10 to 15 repetitions. The intensity of this exercise is light.


#6 – Hip Hinge

Begin in an upright standing position with your legs slightly more than hip-width apart, placing your hands by your ears. Maintain proper alignment with your head, shoulders and hips. Tighten your abdominal muscles. Bend your knees slightly and pivot through your hips to bend your upper body forward, ideally to be parallel to the floor. Raise back up and repeat the movement.

Hip Hinge

Start with 1 set of 10 to 15 repetitions.

Give these six exercises a try and see if you can improve or even eliminate posterior pelvic tilt.

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